Ethics in Child Health – Chapter 3: Can moral problems of everyday clinical practice ever be resolved? (ebook)

£1.50

Chapter 3 of the book – Can moral problems of everyday clinical practice ever be resolved? A proposal for integrative pragmatist approaches

Co-editor Eric Racine is an ethicist with a major interest in child neurodisability. His informative, context-setting chapter was written as the book was being completed, and brings together a number of themes and approaches to ethical analysis. We believe that this chapter will help readers frame their understanding of the cases that populate the book as well as their own real-life professional encounters. It explains and discusses the importance and complexity of the methods by which ethical deliberation processes are engaged. While one chapter can scarcely do more than sketch the outlines of this multifaceted and evolving field, readers may well find themselves returning to this essay as they delve into individual chapters.

About the complete book

Have you ever:

  • Wondered how to deal with a family that repeatedly fails to keep clinic appointments?
  • Disagreed with colleagues over a proposed course of treatment for a child?
  • Considered ways to ‘bump’ a child on a waiting to speed up their assessment?

These are a few of the scenarios faced by clinicians in neurodisability on a daily basis. Ethics in Child Health explores the ethical dimensions of these issues that have either been ignored or not recognised. Each chapter is built around a scenario familiar to clinicians and is discussed with respect to how ethical principles can be utilised to inform decision-making. Useful ‘Themes for Discussion’ are provided at the end of each chapter to help professionals and students develop practical ethical thinking. Ethics in Child Health offers a set of principles that clinicians, social workers and policy-makers can utilise in their respective spheres of influence.

 

Readership: clinicians and paediatricians in neurodisability, service providers in neurodisability, community-based health professionals,  and health policy makers.

[iframe id=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/AvVs5TqaFUY”]